Posts Tagged ‘classics’

5th June
2010
written by Steph

Regardless of what I, or anyone for that matter, think about Lolita as a whole, I think it’s safe to say it has one of the most intoxicating and seductive openings to any novel:
“Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-ta: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate to tap, at three, on the teeth. Lo. Lee. Ta.”
I mean: damn. Just reading that kind of makes me want to read the book all over again, just so I can revel in Nabokov’s awesome language. His writing is so vivid, so bright, so… physical. I love how he uses his words not to just tell a story but to create an experience and effect an emotion in his readers. He manages to get simple words on the page to sing out in song. And of course, this is all done by a man for whom English was just one of three languages he spoke fluently. (more…)
6th August
2009
written by Steph
He'll be back... but will we?

He'll be back... but will we?

When I was younger, I remember being obsessed with Terminator 2.  My parents gave me this little TV that had a built in video recorder, and one of the few things I remember recording was Terminator 2 off of one of the local tv stations (that and a clip off of Entertainment Tonight or some such entertainment new program about Jonathan Taylor Thomas when he was filming Tom and Huck… what?!?  I would have been 12 years old at the time!  Clearly that’s a forgivable offense!).  Flash forward to 2009 at the ripe old age of 26, and while I still remember thinking T2 was awesome, I pretty much only know that it starred Edward Furlong as John Connor, had a shapeshifting T1000, and ends with Arnie giving us a big old thumbs up as he is lowered into a pit of molten metal... And maybe there is something with a playground?  Clearly I had some gaps to fill in. (more…)
27th April
2009
written by Tony
Graham Greene

Graham Greene

I finished this novel quite a while ago, and while I haven’t actively avoided writing this review (I’ve been snowed under at work and it leaves very little mettle for things like this when I get home) I haven’t really felt as though I can do this book justice. There is far more to this book than my limited perspective can grasp on one reading, and it is one of the few books in recent memory (The Master and Margarita being the other) that I immediately felt I needed to read again in order to fully appreciate its subtleties. Touted as Greene’s masterpiece (by none other than John Updike) this is a sparse, short, and searingly raw tale of the exile of an unnamed Catholic priest who is on the run from a fascist and anti-religious government. The novel centers on the revolution in Mexico through the late 1920s that viciously suppressed any and all religion on the order of then president Plutarco Elías Calles. The doctrine was especially brutal in the state of Tobasco, where this novel takes place. There is no use denying that this novel traverses some difficult territory and deals with the human condition in a way that is at once honest and often disturbing. (more…)